What are gurmar leaves and why are they good for diabetics

It is said that having one teaspoon of powdered gurmar leaves with water half an hour after lunch and dinner may help regulate the absorption of carbohydrates in the body.

Gurmar or Gymnema Sylvestre is a tropical plant that is indigenous to India and grows wild in the tropical forests of central, western and southern parts of the country. The medicinal herb also grows in the tropical areas of Africa, Australia, and China. Known for its Ayurvedic properties, gurmar has proven to be beneficial in managing various ailments like diabetes, malaria and even snake bites and digestion issues. Due to the presence of flavonoids, cinnamic acid, folic acid, and ascorbic acid, gurmar leaves are high in antioxidants.

A study published in Journal of Herbs, Spices & Medicinal Plants says that gurmar, which translates to ‘destroyer of sugar’, is rich in several active compounds like gymnemic acid, gymnemasides, anthraquinones, flavones, hentriacontane, pentatriacontane, phytin, resins, tartaric acid, formic acid, butyric acid, lupeol and alkaloid like gymnamine, which make it rich in antidiabetic properties.

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According to WebMD, “Gymnema contains substances that decrease the absorption of sugar from the intestine. Gymnema may also increase the amount of insulin in the body and increase the growth of cells in the pancreas, which is the place in the body where insulin is made.”

It is said that having one teaspoon of powdered gurmar leaves with water half an hour after lunch and dinner may help regulate the absorption of carbohydrates in the body. Also, the gymnemic acids in the herb blocks the sugar receptors on your tongue, decreasing your ability to taste sweetness. This can lead to reduced sugar cravings.

The wonder herb is also known to aid weight loss with research indicating that consuming the leaves for 12 weeks can help reduce the body weight and body mass index in overweight people.

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